UCF students express their love for movies with new talk show

UCF students’ love for movies and entertainment soars to infinity and beyond with new UCF TV show “Beyond the Credits.”

Live from studio 60 at the Nicholson School of Communication (NSC), a host and panelists discuss movie and TV news every Wednesday from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Beyond the Credits” is the only hour-long, student run show at UCF and is broadcast to the NSC channel 734 and available to stream live on YouTube.

The idea for the show came from Matt Diaz, Chris Markcity and junior radio-television production student Megan Robinson, who would all have discussions after seeing movies.

“We would go to the movies and talk for an hour afterward, Markcity, 23, a UCF alumnus, said. All we had to do was put a camera in front of us and we had a show.”

The original idea was to create a podcast, but the team realized they could make a set with equipment in the studio. The show has filmed 12 episodes so far.

“If there are credits at the end of anything, we can talk about it,” said Diaz, 22, a senior radio-television production student.

Some members of the crew arrive at the studio at 9 a.m. to establish set design depending on the number of people on camera, and the rest arrive around 10 a.m. Diaz, the host of the show, confirms topics with the panelists before they go live.

The crew has been experimenting with the number of panelists per show.

Diaz, Markcity and UCF’s “ToKnight’s the Night” host Chris Nielsen, 23, a senior film student, have been working on the show since the beginning. Through word of mouth at NSC, new interested students grabbed a piece of the action.

Ernesto Santos, 28, left his jobs managing Pecos Bill Tall Tale Inn and working at a Walt Disney World café to come back to school and pursue a radio-television production degree.

“I woke up one day and realized this is where I want to be,” Santos said. He is learning the ropes of a technical director on the show.

In front of the camera, junior psychology student Diana Rodriguez, 25, is the show’s latest panelist.

“We [the panelists] have a good balance where two agree and two disagree,” Rodriguez said.

The team works at making the best product they can while having fun. The show’s format includes a game or lighthearted section in the final block for the episode. The set is sometimes adorned with memorabilia supplied by Santos and Markcity.

In a room opposite of the set, a crew of seven to 10 students help broadcast and record the show. Robinson, a radio-television production major, calls the show and makes sure it runs on time. She also serves as communicator between the people on set and those in the production room. Robinson enjoys watching the panelists.

“They have great banter together,” she said.

After the show wraps at 1:30 pm, the crew strikes the set and discusses the quality of the episode, what worked and what didn’t and improvements the show can make moving forward.

Students are encouraged to pop into the studio Wednesdays at 9 a.m. to pitch ideas or inquire about working on the show.

Max Roberts and Gia Doxey contributed to this story.